Monday, June 30, 2014

Yakovlev UT-1b (Mikro-Mir 1/48) - Part 4

Hi,

The cockpit is finally done. Not perfect though, but that will do.

I made a new Instrument Panel as the one in the box was a bit undersized. I used the drawing from the official manual to print my IP on plastic card. The shape of the new IP is not 100% accurate but at least it fits ok now.



I made the instruments with wire and decals. To make it faster, I made a coil out of wire and cut the [i]sausage[/i] in the middle to make plenty of little circles. Just have to choose the roundest ones.






Bezels were first glued with Tamiya extra-fluid cement, and later firmly stuck in place by inserting a toothpick impregnated with CA glue into the holes. The instruments were made from spare decals and sealed with Future + transparent acetate sheet.



The cockpit now finished:





You can notice that the rudder pedals are quite far from the seat. This is explained by Russian pilots having very long legs and wearing stilettos. Saw it too late and couldn't be bothered.


The painting of the headrest will be improved after closing the fuselage.






Monday, June 2, 2014

Yakovlev UT-1b (Mikro-Mir 1/48) - Part 3

 Hi,

Cockpit detailing finally done  ;)

As I said before, I had to make a new seat. I added a cushion for the pilot's buttock and scratched the fifth seat belt that goes between the legs. Not sure though if I am going to keep the cushion for the pilot's butt. BTW, the part numbering is total chaos.



I used fishing line to simulate the rigging on the cockpit sides and modified the engine controls with 3 throttles (instead of 4 as suggested by Mikro-Mir). The mid cable is intentionally out of the axis.





I scratch-made the rudder controls and the stick:


Friday, May 23, 2014

Yakovlev UT-1b (Mikro-Mir 1/48) - Part 2

Hi,

Finally started some interesting work after a looooot of sanding on the wings and fuselage. But it's ok as I started the fun part of scratch-building the cockpit, and that's fun !


Cockpit

The tubular structure of the cockpit needs to be shortened (red line) in order to fit the wings on the fuselage.




The seat provided in the box vaguely looks like the original :






I made a new seat from scratch using 0.25mm plastic sheet helped with the instruction manual of the UT-2.
Of course, I realized later that I misinterpreted the schematics and that (1) reads actually "Shoulder seatbelts", so no sides on that seat ... More on that on Part 3 of this build.

Scratch-built seat with cushion (see Part 3 - for correction)


The headrest is too large to be fitted in the fuselage. Here again a lot of sanding.






On the picture below, two interesting features that will be added. Firstly, the leather bulge (2) just in front of the pilot; but I will take care of it later on. Secondly, the horizontal structure surrounding the pilot (1):




To create this part, I printed a pattern on 0.25mm plastic sheet and cut it accordingly.



I then added a small vertical part that will help to set the PE instrument panel later.


It looks a bit messy with all that ink on plastic. I use that trick to have a good idea if the surface is smooth enough. Ink will be removed before painting to avoid a mess.





Wings

There is a big gap on the wing/fuselage junction and adding 2x0.25 mm of plastic sheet didn't really help.



A  distinctive feature of this plane are the walkway stripes on the root of the left wing. It looks awful on the kit and will be replaced with 7 (not 8 like on kit) very thin strips after gluing the wings.




Thanks for looking

Antoine

Yakovlev UT-1b (Mikro-Mir 1/48) - Part 1


Hi,

After my mainstream AFV F-5, I wanted to start a new project that requires more personal work. I just started the Yakolvlev UT-1b from the Ukrainian manufacturer Mikro-Mir. The UT-1b is based on the trainer/civilian UT-1 which was equipped with two 7.62 ShKAS at the beginning of the war against the huns.

Documentation is scarce but I managed to get a copy of the manual of the 2-seater variant from a fellow French modeller.

The Mikro-Mir kit looks pretty good and is boxed with 2 PE sheets. But it ain't no Tamiya, parts have to be thinned down or replaced. The decal sheet is Zvevda-esque, if you see what I mean....





That's a very small bug. I never built anything that small.






Looks like daddy will have fun thinning down trailing edges  !!




Right now, working on the engine cowling






Nothing very fancy to show right now. Hopefully, more interesting pics to follow.

Tonio

Monday, March 31, 2014

F-5E Aggressor Scheme - AFV 1/48

Hi,

This is the well-known AFV kit. This kit is a real pleasure to build. The main landing gear doors might be a bit tricky to assemble but nothing to bad. I used the Aires cockpit which fits perfectly.

The real hard part of the build was to choose amongst the 20 schemes offered by the AfterBurner decal sheet (Thanks Franck !). I finally chose a Flogger scheme from the 65th Aggressor squadron, 1985.

For once, I am quite happy by the result but I still have to work on taking better pictures...



Painting :
- Sand: 2 H27 + 1 XF2
- Green : 2 H80 + 1 XF-13
- Brown : 4 H84 +2 X-9 +2 H37 + a tad of white (...)
- Free-hand with Iwata Revolution BR 0.3 mm.
- Clear Coat Prince August Polyurethane 50% + XF-20A 50%.







Saturday, May 11, 2013

Kawanishi N1K1 - Tamiya 1/48

Here's my new build. The kit was given to me by my good friend Edde. After spending too much time on my previous project I needed a straightforward build, and this kit is a total pleasure to build !
I like learning new techniques for each of my projects, so here I decided to rivet the whole bird.

The cockpit

I had quite a lot of fun painting the trolley. After a first coat of dark brown, I sprayed some hair lacquer before using a coat of greenish grey. The top layer was then dissolved here and there with a wet brush. The rust effect was achieved with various paint oils.





Riveting took me quite a while but I found it fun and relaxing. I used Rosie the riveter, lots of Dymo tape and a needle for small additions. Model Art #587 is of great help here.

Of course, that's when I had a look a the shots below that I noticed that some imperfections have to be corrected...










I painted the hinomarus with a first layer of white (for opacity), then yellow (so red doesn't look pink) and finally red. And yes, I paint on a rotating cheese tray, cos I am French  :lol:






After pre-shading the model, I sprayed both base colors Tamiya IJN Gray and IJN Green. Of course, I used very diluted paints in order to still see the pre-shade by transparency.
Then, each base color was retouched with the same color darkened with brown and lightened with yellow for the upper surfaces or white for the lower surfaces.



On the pics below, the main float and the wings look darker simply because I started polishing the paint with an old cotton rag.











Still have a bit of work with the hinomarus but I am already quite happy by the way it looks. Anyway, on real planes the markings are not always perfectly painted.






And that's how it looks like finished. I use this so-called matt coat from Andrea that looks... glossy. From past experience, I am confident that it will turn matt in a few weeks.



I am quite happy with how the riveting turned out, it's quite subtle and only noticeable when you are close enough.




Thanks for looking and a special thank to Edde for the gift - Me happy :-)